Nonexistent Detriments

Nonexistent Detriments

This past week I have finally realized why the world has and will always constantly struggle with a shortage of neurosurgeons. Initially focused primarily on statistics and numbers, this insufficient number of workers seemed at the very least irrational. For a salary reaching up to $700,000 – on rare occasions $1,000,000 – I could not seem to find a possible explanation as to why people would chose against this profession.

However, my third research assessment has explicated one crucial aspect of neuroscience, particularly in surgery: simply put, neuroscience is work a lot of work. Throughout all of the technical terms and vernacular, the specific and convoluted surgical diagrams, and possible symptoms and side effects of certain operations, I could visibly see my interest in this field fall into a pit of doubt and fear. I began to ask myself whether this path is truly right for me.

The “human” side of me covets the easy route in life –  exemplifying a biological concept of optimal foraging behavior, in which an organism’s actions are geared to have minimum costs or losses for maximum benefit. While it is rare that I actually find the answer to this question in a considerably short amount of time, I realized the serious assets of this Independent Study and Mentorship Program. It offers me a fruitful experience, in which I can delve into my possible passions and future careers without any fear that I have chosen incorrectly, as experience is never an detriment. Therefore, as I will officially begin my cold calls and interview process, I am at the very least excited to see what this new week has to offer – possibly seeing my interests flourish, despite arduousness intensifying.

 

 

 

Pilot

Pilot

Towards the beginning of the week, I learned about the Independent Study and Mentorship (ISM) program’s protocol, in addition to business interactions and formal dress attire. We developed interpersonal skills within a context of the business world, including proper conduct and cold calls. I learned of the uncomfortable nature behind cold calls and contacting business professionals and the serious need for practice and preparation. While we had an outline to base our cold calls off of, I found it essential and more natural to deviate from this draft and improvise as a normal conversation is like.

As the first week of formal research began, I had a very limited knowledge of my topic: neuroscience. Trying to find a start somewhere, somehow, I began to focus on one of the very few things neurosurgery-related that I am actually aware of: awake craniotomy. Even though I had a general understanding of what it is, the depth of such a concept opened my eyes and revealed to me the abundance of unknown of the neuroscience world.

Having a very minimal knowledge of the subject has proven to be a complication of its own, as interviewing someone regarding a subject I am hardly aware of limits myself to very one-dimensional questions and obvious inquiries. While it has been a bit frustrating,  I at least have a clear understanding of what I need to do in order to accomplish my tasks and equip myself for interviews: research, research, research. Despite everything, I am still excited to discover an universe unfamiliar to me – filled with infinite and unimaginable possibilities.